Glycerol

UNDER REVIEW (September 2016)

Mechanism of Action:

Glycerol is a component of triglycerides that forms the backbone linking fatty acids together. It is soluble in water and has many uses, medically (e.g. as a lubricant, laxative, and in medications to treat cough) and otherwise (e.g. in liquid soap).

Lecture and CAL material:

Ricinoleic Acid

UNDER REVIEW (September 2016)

Mechanism of Action:

Ricinoleic acid is an unsaturated fatty acid that makes up a large part of castor oil. It has long been used as a irritant purative because of its laxative properties. It is also used to treat skin problems like inflammation (anti-inflammatory properties) and infection (bactericidal). It offers some degree of analgesia

Lecture and CAL materials:

Senna

UNDER REVIEW (September 2016)

Mechanism of Action:

Derived from a shrub-like plant that has glycosides of sugar and anthracene (which is oxidized to anthraquinone). Has been used since ancient times as a purgative agent. Bacteria work on senna (the drug) to break the glycosidic bond, releasing anthracene into the colon. There it stimulates enteric nerves that control the GI system to increase smooth muscle activity and also leads to secretion of water and electrolytes.

Lecture and CAL materials: