Isotretinoin

UNDER REVIEW (September 2016)

Mechanism of Action:

Isotretinoin is a vitamin A derivative which reduces keratinocyte proliferation by binding to nuclear receptors. In addition, the drug reduces sebum production, and limits colonisation of pilosebaceous units by the bacterium Propionibacterium acnes.

Lecture and CAL materials:

  • CAL: Nuclear Hormone

Acitretin

UNDER REVIEW (April 2017)

Mechanism of Action:

Acitretin is a vitamin A derivative (a retinoid) which reduces keratinocyte proliferation by binding to nuclear receptors.

Lecture and CAL materials:

  • CAL: Nuclear Hormone

Dapsone

Indications:

  • Antimicrobial: Leprosy; prophylaxis of malaria, pneumocystis
  • Disease-modifying drug in cutaneous vasculitis and some other skin conditions.

Mechanism of Action:

Dapsone is an antibiotic most commonly used for the treatment of Mycobacterium leprae infections (leprosy). Dapsone can also be used to treat dermatitis herpetiformis and other skin conditions. Dapsone is thought to act by depleting the body’s stores of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA).

Lecture and CAL materials: (under review)

Hydrocortisone

UNDER REVIEW (September 2016)

Mechanism of Action:

Short-acting synthetic form of the natural glucocorticoid cortisol. Glucocorticoids exert their actions by binding and activating cytoplasmic steroid receptors. Together, they move to the nucleus, causing increased or decreased transcription of genes leading, for example, to increased anti-inflammatory proteins and decreased osteoblast activity. Although hydrocortisone has glucocorticoid activity it has only weak mineralocorticoid (aldosterone-like) activity.

Lecture and CAL materials: